Home Organization Siloam Springs youth league president charged with stealing from organization

Siloam Springs youth league president charged with stealing from organization

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SILOAM SPRINGS — The president of the Siloam Springs Youth Baseball League was removed from his financial duties this week after being accused of stealing thousands of dollars from the organization.

Michael Williamson, 48, of Siloam Springs was arrested March 18 for theft of property. Prosecutors have not filed any formal charges against him.

He was released on a citation after his arrest.

The league’s board of directors met on Monday and voted to strip Williamson of his financial duties, but he will remain as league president, according to the minutes of the meeting.

Williamson will not have access to league money and the board will reassess the situation at its next meeting on Aug. 22.

His arrest was the result of an investigation by Siloam Springs police. Williamson is accused of stealing $6,116.41 from the league, according to a probable cause affidavit.

League board member Joey Spivey reported in February that he suspected Williamson of using league money for personal gain, according to the affidavit.

Spivey told police the first suspicious transaction he saw was an ATM withdrawal on January 21 at Centennial Bank for $504 plus a $6 fee. There was another ATM withdrawal for the same amount on January 24 at the bank, according to the affidavit.

Spivey reported that Williamson withdrew $3,100 on November 12, the affidavit states. He made a $203.25 withdrawal plus $6 fees at Cherokee Casino and a $400 withdrawal on Jan. 24 at Grand Savings Bank of Grove, Okla., according to the affidavit.

Williamson told police some of the withdrawals were refunds of $1,800 of his money he spent on the league during the 2020 season. Williamson said none of the board members knew he was making the withdrawal to reimburse himself, according to the affidavit.

Williamson said he made a lot of money last year at the casino and never expected to be reimbursed for the items, the affidavit states.

He told police he withdrew the $3,100 to pay league taxes to the state and that the $203.25 he withdrew from the casino had begun to pay off, the affidavit states. . Williamson said he then gambled with the money, according to the affidavit.

Police questioned Williamson about buying an Oculus gaming system for $295 at Walmart Supercenter and Williamson said he bought the system for a prize at a fundraiser in March, according to the affidavit. . Police questioned Williamson about the Facebook video of family members playing the system, and Williamson said the system was ready and playing, the affidavit states.

Williamson said in the Feb. 22 interview that the system was out of the box and next to a TV, according to the affidavit.

He admitted to using some of the money from the withdrawals to pay his personal bills, according to the affidavit.

Williamson told police he withdrew $504 for reimbursement on Jan. 28 from the casino after losing about $500, then withdrew $503.25 on Feb. 14 and the same amount three days later from the casino, according to the affidavit.

Julie McCallister, another board member, told police she was unaware that Williamson was taking money for her personal use or reimbursing herself.

Marshall Young, the league’s vice president, told police he had no idea Williamson was taking the money for personal use or to play. Young said he knew Williamson purchased helmets and other items in 2020 but never provided receipts, according to the affidavit.

Young said he knew Williamson took the $3,100 to pay league taxes to obtain the 501(c)3 tax exemption, according to the affidavit.

Police later learned that Williamson told Cody Dowden, his lawyer, that he had not paid the taxes because the $3,100 was not for league taxes, but rather related to a food truck that he and his wife had in 2016, according to the affidavit.

The affidavit says Williamson claimed the $3,100 was still in a bag of money, but does not say whether Williamson returned the money to the league.

Williamson did not respond to a phone call or text message seeking comment.

His arraignment is scheduled for April 25 at 8 a.m. in court under Benton County Circuit Judge Brad Karren.